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Barclodiad y Gawres Burial Chamber

Barclodiad y Gawres Burial Chamber

Barclodiad y Gawres (Welsh for apronful of the giantess) is a Neolithic burial chamber on the coast of the island of Anglesey in North Wales. It is an example of a cruciform passage grave, a notable feature being its decorated stones. Similar graves and marks exist across the Irish Sea in the Boyne Valley. The chamber has been re-roofed with concrete. Two cremated male burials were found within the south-western side-chamber. The central area contained the remains of a fire on which had been poured a stew including wrasse, eel, frog, toad, grass-snake, mouse, shrew, and hare, then covered with limpet shells and pebbles.
More or less equidistant from Aberffraw and Rhosneigr, it is on the north side of Porth Trecastell/Cable Bay, on the Anglesey Coastal Path, and a short walk from the A4080. It is cared for by the Welsh heritage organisation Cadw. From April to October at weekends and bank holidays it is possible to enter the chamber, if accompanied by a keyholder (from the Wayside shop in Llanfaelog)…

Basingwerk Abbey

Basingwerk Abbey

Basingwerk Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Dinas Basing) is the ruin of an abbey near Holywell, Flintshire, Wales, in the care of Cadw (Welsh Heritage).
The abbey was founded in 1132 by Ranulph de Gernon, 2nd Earl of Chester, who brought Benedictine monks from Savigny Abbey in southern Normandy. In 1147, the abbey became part of the Cistercian Order and therefore a daughter house of Buildwas Abbey in Shropshire. In 1157, the abbey was given the manor of Glossop by King Henry II. The hilltop Monks’ Road and the Abbot’s Chair in Glossop is a reminder of the monks’ efforts to administer their possession. Earlier on, they had received the manor of West Kirby from the Earls of Chester. In the 13th century, the abbey was under the patronage of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Gwynedd, and his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn gave St Winefride’s Well to the abbey. The monks harnessed the power of the Holywell stream to run a corn mill and to treat the wool from their sheep. In 1536, abbey life came to an end with the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Its dissolution was made lawful by the Dissolution of the Lesser Monasteries Act.
Two centuries earlier a Welsh seer, Robin Ddu ("Robin the Dark") said the roof on the refectory would do very nicely on a little church under Moel Famau. It did. When the abbey was sold, the roof went to Cilcain church and the amazing Jesse window went to the church at Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch.
Today, the abbey ruin is part of Greenfield Valley Heritage Park …

Beaumaris Castle

Beaumaris Castle

Beaumaris Castle, located in Beaumaris, Anglesey, Wales was built as part of King Edward I’s campaign to conquer the north of Wales. It was designed by James of St. George and was begun in 1295, but never completed. Beaumaris has been designated as a World Heritage site.
Beaumaris castle was positioned to face the royal llys at Abergwyngregyn on the opposite shore of the Menai Strait and was intended, along with Conwy Castle and Caernarfon Castle at either end of the Menai Strait, to overshadow the Welsh Royal home and centre of resistance to the English forces …

Blaenavon Ironworks

Blaenavon Ironworks

Blaenavon Ironworks is an industrial museum in Blaenavon in Wales. The ironworks was of crucial importance in the development of the ability to use cheap, low quality, high sulphur iron ores worldwide. It was the site of the experiments by Sidney Gilchrist Thomas and his cousin Percy Gilchrist that led to "the basic steel process" or "Gilchrist-Thomas process".
It is located close to Blaenavon, in Torfaen, which is a World Heritage Site …

Bodowyr Burial Chamber

Bodowyr Burial Chamber

Bodowyr is a Neolithic burial chamber made of a few large stacked stones (also known as a dolmen or a passage grave) in a farmer’s field on the north Wales island of Anglesey …

Brecon Gaer Roman Fort

Brecon Gaer Roman Fort

Y Gaer, Brecon (Latin: Cicucium) is a Roman fort situated near modern day Brecon in Mid Wales, United Kingdom …

Bronllys Castle

Bronllys Castle

Bronllys is a village in Powys, Wales between the nearby towns Brecon and Talgarth. It has recently benefitted from a new bypass as part of the Talgarth Relief Road and Bronllys Bypass scheme.
The village offers a range of services from a petrol station and DIY shop to a Tex Mex restaurant and embroidery and printwear shop. Despite being a tiny village it even has its own swimming pool and small leisure centre …

Bryn Celli Ddu Burial Chamber

Bryn Celli Ddu Burial Chamber

Bryn Celli Ddu is a prehistoric site on the Welsh island of Anglesey located near Llanddaniel Fab. Its name means ‘the mound in the dark grove’. It was plundered in 1699 and archaeologically excavated between 1928 and 1929.
During the Neolithic period a stone circle and henge stood at the site. An area of burnt material containing a small human bone from the ear, covered with a flat stone, was recovered.
The stones were removed in the early Bronze Age when an archetypal passage grave was built over the top of the centre of the henge. A carved stone with a twisting, serpentine design stood in the burial chamber. It has since been moved to the National Museum of Wales and replaced with a replica standing outside. An earth barrow covering the grave is a twentieth century restoration; the original was probably much bigger.
Norman Lockyer, who in 1906 published the first systematic study of megalithic astronomy, had argued that Bryn Celli Ddu marked the summer solstice. This was ridiculed at the time, but research by Christopher Knight and Robert Lomas in 1997- 98 showed this to be true[1]. Knight and Lomas also claimed year round alignments allowed the site to be used as an agricultural calendar. Steve Burrow, curator of Neolithic archaeology at Amgueddfa Cymru (National Museum of Wales) has more recently supported the case for summer solstice alignment. This alignment links Bryn Celli Ddu to a handful of other sites, including Maes Howe and Newgrange, both of which point to the midwinter solstice. It has also been suggested that a feature similar to the ‘lightbox’ at Newgrange may be matched at Bryn Celli Ddu (Pitts, 2006).
A row of five postholes previously thought to have been contemporary with the tomb (c. 3000 BC) have recently been proven to be much earlier. Early results from a radiocarbon programme date pine charcoal from two of the pits to the Mesolithic (Pitts, 2006) …

Bryntail Lead Mine Buildings

Bryntail Lead Mine Buildings

Bryntail lead mine is a disused lead mine near Llanidloes in Powys, Wales. It is currently in the care of Cadw.
There were three main shafts, Murray’s, Gundry’s and Western shaft. The majority of the scheduled buildings on the site are associated with Gundry’s shaft, including a barytes mill, two crushing houses, ore bins, roasting ovens and water tanks. On the eastern dressing floor are jigger box placements, three buddles, two more ore bins and washing and picking floors. Other mine buildings include the manager’s office, smithy, store buildings and a circular magazine …

Caer Gybi Roman Fortlet

Caer Gybi Roman Fortlet

Caer Gybi was a small fortlet in Roman Wales in the Roman province of Britannia Superior. Its name in Latin is unknown. Today it stands at the centre of Holyhead in the Welsh county of Anglesey. Holyhead is named Caergybi in Welsh, after the fort.
The fort is one of Europe’s only three-walled Roman forts. The fourth side fronted the sea and was probably the site of a quay. Its date is unknown, but it is generally thought to be part of a late-4th-century scheme, associated with Segontium, which was set up to defend the west coast against Irish sea-raiders. The Romans also built a watch tower, within Mynydd y Twr on the top of Holyhead Mountain, which was almost certainly used as the fort’s look-out point. Both were probably abandoned around 393, when the troops were probably sent to respond to the revolt of Eugenius of Gaul.
In the 6th century, the old fort was given to Saint Cybi, who founded a monastery there. The Church of St Cybi still stands on the site today, with a small detached chapel over Cybi’s grave …